CRONIN, Bruce

ISBN 978-1-922629-80-7
PAPERBACK

The Man From Fiddler’s Green

Bedtime stories of soldiers, seafarers, adventurers, of heroes and villains. The Artful Dodger – a good kid, and Fagin – just a teacher. I never wanted the highwaymen to be caught, I grew up wanting the Indians to beat the Cowboys.

Between the ages of two and three, I remember being taken to the air-raid shelter to escape possible death from the German V1 or V2 rockets which caused 30, 000 civilian casualties. I remember Churchill’s voice booming defiance and encouragement to the nation on the wireless. Later I was entranced by the program Desert Island Discs and the introduction line ‘faraway places with strange-sounding names’.

Is it any wonder I grew up a dreamer, a romantic, a lover of books, good stories, poets, adventurers and stories of Australia? Some kids grew up wanting to be a train driver. I grew up wanting to be a swagman.

I followed my dreams. Better than that I found a girl to share those dreams. Trish was to become a wonderful lover, wife,
mother and lifelong friend. This is her story as much as mine.

About the Author

Tinker, tailor, poor man, beggar man, thief,
Doctor, baker, fine shoe maker,
Wise man, mad man, taxman, please,
How did I know just what to be?
Good people stopped and gave advice to me.
Who told me what to do?
Will you say that I’ve been true?
Maybe
Maybe
Perhaps I’ve been a great success,
Or possibly a dreadful mess.
Maybe
Maybe
My life has been a little game.

LAWLESS, James

ISBN 978-1-922722-28-7
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Nobody Dies Anymore vol.1 & 2

An African villager on the Zambian Plateau made the remark that inspired the title of this book. He was describing the impact of western medicine on a community where it was previously unknown.

In 1964 the United States Government, the Government of the Irish Republic and the Zambian Government negotiated the construction and staffing of a children’s hospital on the Copperbelt, probably the richest mineral area in the world.

The three presidents, Kaunda, Johnson and De Valera were all personally involved in the project associated with the project, a Flying Doctor Service was to be established, designed to construct and operate airfields and clinics in the remote and rural areas of Zambia.

Penicillin and chloroquine were two of the most formidable motivators for development in Africa. The advantages they produced, life instead of death, redefined the obligations of society and they had, by themselves, the capacity to revolutionise the continent.

About the Author

In ten years, James Lawless had started Zambia’s first Children’s Hospital, established the Zambian Flying Doctor Service and become very close to the people of Zambia. Between them, the couple had two significant papers on paediatrics published in the Lancet. On their return to their home country, they lived in North Yorkshire. Jim wrote
of his experiences and they both did some general practice. He tried unsuccessfully to introduce the Zambian villagers’ concept of consensus to British Industry. The last four decades were spent in Australia, working in Apollo Bay, a fairly remote coastal town in Victoria. For the first 20 years, they were the only doctors.
Again, Jim had an enormous impact on the area — a characteristic of his whole life.
He died in Apollo Bay in 2016.

 
 

HANDBY, Bob

ISBN 978-1-922722-18-8
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You will go, won’t you?

A telephone call ‘out of the blue’ started Bob’s 30 year career with the Red Cross and Red Crescent evaluating and providing safe water and public health projects throughout the world.

Released from his duties in local government, he undertook humanitarian missions to conflicts including the ‘Bush War’ in Uganda, Kurds fleeing Saddam Hussein in Northern Iraq, genocide in Rwanda and civil war in Sri Lanka. Other missions were to natural disasters in the Pacific Island countries, Pakistan, Myanmar and the Boxing Day Tsunami. Bob worked in Sierra Leone during the height of the Ebola outbreak.

Bob Handby’s story tells of his day to day life in the field – sad, humorous and confronting. At times facing danger and challenges, whilst working with the local people who showed incredible bravery and resilience.

When things are difficult they take a long time to fix, when they are impossible they take a little bit longer.

Bob Handby, self-published author of You will go, won't you?

About the Author

Robert (Bob) Handby is retired and lives in Port Fairy, Australia with his wife Judi. He is in demand to pass on his experience and knowledge. People are intrigued by his stories working as an aid worker in the field.

Bob was awarded the Order of Australia in 2018 in recognition of his international humanitarian work.

 
 

LINLEY, Carol

ISBN 978-1-922629-86-9
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Tapestries of Time

Carol Linley with Margot J.

Luisa Kelly always believed in her Pa Angus’ foretelling that one day she would tell her story. He had implied during an extremely tough time in her life that there was a greater purpose to all Luisa was experiencing and that one day she would share it with the world. She patiently waited and waited for the right time and means. Once that opportunity arose, Luisa bravely embarked on an incredible journey.

Tapestries of Time is the product of her exploration. What has evolved is the narrative of an incredibly resilient woman reflecting on her life. Remarkable vulnerability is contained in Luisa’s recollections, inseparable from the courage exposed when extremely raw, deep and difficult emotions surfaced.
Yes, this book is about remembering and retelling. Yet the cumulative process has been purposeful in the coalescence of her transformation; in enabling Luisa to reflect, reveal and reclaim her heart’s truths, thereby rediscovering her true nature. Amidst the plethora of colours, images, emotions and situations offered, you will undoubtably find yourself somewhere in her tapestry picture.

LAWLESS, James

ISBN 978-1-922629-68-5
PAPERBACK

Nobody Dies Anymore. vol.2

It is about the colonial apartheid system as it then operated, the convulsions that accompanied its destructions and the ensuing struggle to create what had not been there before.

The origins of the book lie in the Children’s ward of what was then the Llewellyn Hospital in Kitwe, where hundreds of children died every year, the recorded casualties of a desperate battle against history’s nature and the implications of being black in Africa. It is a personal account written by the doctor who formulated the ideals behind the projects and the philosophy they were meant to sustain.

A kind of Odyssey passing through the gates of imperial security into the realm of demands with no known cultural response, it is a journey from which there is no return and a task with no hope of accomplishment in the lifetime of a man.

About the Author

Jim was born in 1930 in Oldham, Lancashire-at that time at the centre of England’s thriving cotton industry. His father was later to become part owner of a Mill. Educated at Xavarian college Manchester he excelled at English and Physics. In the post war era National Service was compulsory and Jim joined the RAF, only to be discharged after 3 months because of a chronic lung condition (bronchiectasis) the result of multiple childhood chest infections.
Unsure where his future lay he was encouraged to follow his father in the cotton trade, initially gaining experience by working as a weaver in the mill. After a year he decided to become a doctor. At Huddersfield Technical College he completed the subjects required for entrance into medical school. It was there he showed his leadership skills and became President of the Students Union. In 1953 he went to St Andrews University to study medicine, where he met Meg Arrowsmith, a fellow medical student. They were engaged but did not marry until 1959, in Jim’s final year. He was a high-profile student and became President of the Students Union, President of the Medical Society and Editor of the University Newspaper. Jim was by personality type a ‘world improver’ and his whole life was based on improving the circumstances in which he found himself so that other people would benefit. He had little regard for his own welfare and gave his all to the project in hand.
Newly married Jim and Meg spent a year in USA, working at the Miriam Hospital Providence, Rhode Island. Their plan was to then spend a year in a developing country and were accepted by the colonial territory of Northern Rhodesia to work in the hospital in Kitwe. That year extended to a decade. In1961 the country was in a state of Pre Independence unrest. Jim and Meg were among the few Europeans who supported the African move towards Independence and were shocked by the racial discrimination even in the hospitals. Through looking after their children Jim got to know the leaders of the Independence movement, including Kenneth Kaunda who in 1964 became the founding father and first President of Zambia.
It was difficult to returning to the UK 1970. In ten years, Jim had started Zambia’s first Children’s Hospital, established the Zambian Flying Doctor Service and become very close to the people of Zambia. Between them the couple had two significant papers on paediatrics published in the Lancet. On their return to their home country, they lived in North Yorkshire. Jim wrote of his experiences and they both did some general practice. He tried unsuccessfully to introduce the Zambian villagers’ concept of consensus to British Industry. The last four decades were spent in Australia, working in Apollo Bay, a fairly remote coastal town in Victoria. For the first 20 years they were the only doctors.
Again, Jim had an enormous impact on the area — a characteristic of his whole life.
He died in Apollo Bay in 2016.

BECK, Lucy

ISBN 978-1-922629-52-4
PAPERBACK

Take it On

Lucy was diagnosed with cancer when she was just 6 years old. “Take it on” written by Lucy herself details her journey and is intended to help other young people who may be starting their own journey, what they can expect to feel and experience along the way.

 

About the Author

Hi, I’m Lucy.
I was diagnosed when I was 6. Before I knew I had cancer, I was feeling very sick in the mornings and would vomit. After that, I would be fine. I found out I had cancer after I had a CT scan, which was done in a big loud donut shaped machine. 
Have you had one of them?
Through this new journey, it’s ok to feel scared; I know I was! Lots of things are going to change, but just remember there are lots of people around you who can help and explain any questions you may have. My family, including my Mum, Dad and Brother were always there for me no matter what, and still are today.
So… Do whatever you can to beat this monster! I know you can do it; after all, this is your journey.